Members of the Harlem Roscoe Fire Department and Chief Don Shovelin helped load supplies.

In the wake of category 4 hurricanes Harvey, which affected areas near Rockport, Texas and southwest Louisiana people came together to aid victims.
Locally a collaboration formed and on Monday, Sept. 11. Pastor Cheryl Coffman of Prince of Peace Church picked up a U-Haul trailer and drove over to the Roscoe United Methodist Church. The trailer was parked along the road in front of the church. Pastor Paul Meyers of Roscoe United Methodist Church painted two signs reading, “Donate to Texas “on each.
Each was created in bright red paint and placed on both ends of the collection area. All day long people who spotted the sign stopped by to drop off supplies or generous financial donations which were used to help cover travel expenses.
The Harlem-Roscoe Fire Department joined in collection efforts. Partnering with the previously noted churches and fire departments collecting donations were St John’s Lutheran Church in Elkhorn, Wis., First Lutheran Church, Ottumwa, Iowa, and Hosanna! Lutheran, St. Charles, Illinois, Prince of Peace Lutheran, Rockton, IL, Eagle Grove Evangelical Lu-theran, Eagle Grove, Iowa, Hope Lutheran Church, Kansas City, Missouri, Roscoe Park Department- Texas, and Warner Electric, Beloit, Wis.
Rockton United Methodist Church gave a total of $1,027 through the United Methodist Commission on Relief. The UMCOR continues giving back to those in need on a regular basis.
By Wednesday, Sept.11 everything was packed and loaded into the U- haul. Pastor Coffman and her traveling companion (her dog Tucker) headed down south fully prepared to make a difference.
Coffman has roots in the sand hills of Portales, New Mexico. She married a cowboy and lived in the Texas Panhandle for 25 years. “Now I call home base Liberty, Missouri, said Coffman. “My home church there is Hope Lutheran Church, Kan-sas City, Missouri.”
Coffman reflects on the trip. “It took longer than I had anticipated making the journey. There was a lot of construction and when you are pulling a loaded trailer, every bump in the road is magnified 100 times. At times it was like driving over a washboard.”
Coffman planned on staying a few extra days when mapping out her course. “I wanted to see how I could help instead of simply dropping the supplies off and coming back home. This gave me a chance to meet and talk with people and to see firsthand the devastation and the recovery efforts, “said Coffman.
“This is the first time I have actually ever seen and talked with those directly affected by a disaster of this magnitude,” said Coffman. “Seeing pictures and videos cannot fully capture the enormity of the scene.
“To drive down street after street where homes have tarps covering what is left of their roofs, window openings with boards covering them; furniture, clothes, and memories all piled in yards, along with pile after pile of waterlogged sheet-rock.”
“What cannot be seen from the outside is the black mold invading

For full story, pick up this week’s print edition.